Issue #12

With Omicron now rapidly spreading throughout the motu and increasing numbers of whānau in isolation with positive cases, it has meant living with frequent changes to our approach and the way we do things.

Issue #12

 

Tēnā koutou e ngā poupou o te whare hauora,

With Omicron now rapidly spreading throughout the motu and increasing numbers of whānau in isolation with positive cases, it has meant living with frequent changes to our approach and the way we do things. Moving from keeping Covid out of our homes to self-managing Covid-19 at home is a big shift, both practically and mentally. Over the past week, we’ve moved almost completely away from PCR testing to Rapid Antigen Testing (RAT) and have changed which contacts need to isolate and for how long. We want to ensure our content and platforms are relevant so will continue to evolve to support the changing needs of whānau. In this pānui we have included some tips on what you might include in your self-isolation kete and have shared some great examples of whānau plans. We include an instructional video on how to take a RAT test, and a whānau from Kawerau shares the struggles and conflict of their vaccination journey. 

In this issue:

Launch of RAT requester site

Kete Whānau

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei – Whai Māia
COVID-19 Response

Karawhiua digital marketing

Karawhiua – looking back and forward

Funding for the Māori Omicron response

Study on whānau impacts of COVID-19

Sharing COVID-19 experiences

 

Launch of RAT requester site

 

If you’re symptomatic or a household contact, you can now order rapid antigen tests (RATs) through the newly launched RAT requester site. As of late last week, there were 146 collection sites, 106 testing centres, and 21 providers supporting priority population groups nationwide. And with the addition of participating pharmacies and GPs, there are now more than 500 access points for RATs, with additional sites continuing to be opened across the motu.

The ability to place an order online will streamline the process when people go to collect them. It also means the whole whānau don’t need to queue at the testing centre when one person in the household gets sick, as you can collect RATs for everyone in your whare. You can still access free RATs without an order via Community Testing Centres, but only for an eligible individual.

 

 

Kete Whānau

We’ve been gathering examples of kete whānau from iwi and Māori providers across the motu. Here are links to three examples, the first from Te Arawa and another from Te Waharoa, a collective of iwi in the Western and Eastern Bay of Plenty. The other is for Tāngata Whaikaha. Please keep an eye out for these and other rauemi ipurangi on the Shared Resources section of our website.

 

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei – Whai Māia COVID-19 Response

 

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei is providing an awesome COVID-19 response for whānau across the Tāmaki Makaurau region. Through Whai Māia, the tribal development arm of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust, they have helped to provide a broad range of offerings to inform and protect whānau.

These have included multiple vaccination clinics with free health checks for tamariki, pop-up COVID-19 testing stations and #ShotDoy across the rohe, 
regular pānui across Facebook and Instagram, and a dedicated webpage with a wealth of information to support whānau.

Their Whītiki Whātua team provide support to Covid-positive whānau isolating at home, and their household. Their kaimahi can make a tailored plan with whānau on how best to support them while in isolation. They'll also conduct COVID-19 tests and in some cases provide RAT kits for whānau who have not yet tested positive. Whānau are able to contact the team on their dedicated Whītiki Whātua 0800 number helpline, 7 days a week between 8am and 8pm or by email.

They are also running an informative yet fun webisode series called "Tiakina Tātou i a Tātou - The Webseries." These short webisodes so far include an 
expert panel answering pātai from whānau, guest speakers sharing their experiences of getting COVID-19, and the host shopping for items for her Iso-Kit#TiakinaTātou #NWŌResponse #ShotDoy

 

 

Karawhiua digital marketing

Our new Karawhiua digital marketing campaign has kicked off again with a focus on whānau planning for isolation, as well as continuing to showcase the benefits of vaccination. One of our first cabs off the rank includes Wairoa GPs Mania Campbell-Seymour and Turuki Tahuri. Mania (Te Whakatōhea, Tūhoe, Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki) and Turuki (Ngāti Kahungunu ki te Wairoa, Tūhoe) say the basis of their whānau planning has been the whakataukī ‘Ka ora pea au i a koe, ka ora koe i a au. Perhaps I survive because of you and you because of me.’ We’re also set to release this powerful story about the Thompson whānau from Kawerau. Davina (Te Arawa, Ngāti Awa) and Clayton (Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei) had a change of heart about the vaccine, sparked by their daughter’s sporting aspirations. Watch their story here. Ngā mihi nunui to Te Amokura Productions for sourcing these stories from our communities. 

 

Karawhiua – looking back and forward

The Karawhiua campaign started in May and the Government recently announced it has been extended until December 2022. The digital campaign produced significant results in its first seven months, attracting nearly 50 million impressions across social media, Google display, Google search and YouTube. It attracted 2.6 million video views and 1.5 million post engagements, while the website attracted over 300,000 visits. Last year’s campaign was focused on vaccination. This will continue, but we’re expanding our focus to include whānau resilience as we all work to navigate our way through the presence of Omicron in our whare and hapori – and the potential emergence of new variants.

 

Funding for the Māori Omicron response

The Government recently announced an extra $140 million in funding to support Māori and Pasifika communities through Omicron. The package includes several funding pathways that facilitate access and connect whānau to health and welfare services and provide continuity of care. The pathways sit alongside Care in the Community funding to support the welfare needs of whānau who contract COVID-19 and need to self-isolate. Find out more about funding pathways, criteria and how to access funding here.

 

Study on whānau impacts of COVID-19

Te Herenga Waka – Victoria University of Wellington has launched a nationwide study to assess the impacts of COVID-19 on whānau in Aotearoa. Dr Lynne Russell (Ngāti Kahungunu, Rangitāne, Kāi Tahu, Ngāti Porou) is co-leading the research and says the effects of COVID-19 on Māori, Pacific communities and whānau hauā (disabled communities) are a key focus. Those who want to participate in the Ministry of Health-funded study, can go to covidaotearoa.com, call 0800 800 581 or send an email. Find information about the study for hapori Māori and the rōpū leading this work here.

 

Sharing COVID-19 experiences

Flaxmere couple Rikki and Cilla Te Kira experienced COVID-19 in January when Cilla tested positive. They shared their experience with Hawkes Bay Today in the hope it might help others to be prepared. Read more here and check out their online video...

How can we help?

If you’re looking to get involved in the Karawhiua campaign, co-brand with us or would like some support, flick us an email to discuss what we can do for you.

You can also check out the Karawhiua Resources page for videos, posters and brand guidelines you may want to use in your own vaccination campaigns. There are heaps of other useful resources for whānau and Māori communities that are worth checking out on the Shared Resources section. If you know of other resources you think we should add, please send them through!

Until next time …Kia kaha! Kia māia! Karawhiua!
 

Karawhiua Team